Difference between revisions of "Paul Revere Foundry"

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The Paul Revere Foundry, Massachusetts was a historically famous foundry of ornamental household products; a side product line was the casting of church & school bells.
 
The Paul Revere Foundry, Massachusetts was a historically famous foundry of ornamental household products; a side product line was the casting of church & school bells.
  
The Revere Foundry, Established in 1821 was operated by Joseph Revere and Paul Revere III, (Paul Revere’s grandson) until 1828. During this time, Paul Revere III and William Blake (his apprentice) cast some 334 church bells (1821 to 1830). The church bell casting became a separate company: Revere & Blake Foundry, Boston, Ma. (The Paul Revere Foundry became the Revere Copper Co., incorporated in 1828, and still exists today.)
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The Revere Foundry, Established in 1821 was operated by Joseph Revere and Paul Revere III, (Paul Revere’s grandson) until 1828. During this time, Paul Revere III and hisi apprentice, William Blake, cast some 334 church bells (1821 to 1830). The church bell casting became a separate company: Revere & Blake Foundry, Boston, Ma. (The Paul Revere Foundry became the Revere Copper Co., incorporated in 1828, and still exists today.)
  
William Blake &amp; Paul Revere III continued the church bell casting with an apprentice Henry Hooper. In 1830, the foundry became known as the Hooper, Blake &amp; Revere Foundry until 1868.<br> Post Civil War, the foundry operated as the Hooper, Blake &amp; Richardson Foundry; later as the Henry N. Hooper &amp; Co., and The Hooper Co.
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William Blake &amp; Paul Revere III continued the church bell casting with an apprentice, Henry Hooper. In 1830, the foundry became known as the Hooper, Blake &amp; Revere Foundry until 1868.<br> Post Civil War, the foundry operated as the Hooper, Blake &amp; Richardson Foundry; later as the Henry N. Hooper &amp; Co., and The Hooper Co.
  
 
George Holbrook was another apprentice of Revere's who cast bells of his own in Boston. George continued to work in the foundry after operations were handed over to his son George Handel Holbrook. Chime Master has renovated an 1833 Holbrook bell for the Whitin Mill in Whitinsville Mass. with replicas of the original wooden yoke and wheel.
 
George Holbrook was another apprentice of Revere's who cast bells of his own in Boston. George continued to work in the foundry after operations were handed over to his son George Handel Holbrook. Chime Master has renovated an 1833 Holbrook bell for the Whitin Mill in Whitinsville Mass. with replicas of the original wooden yoke and wheel.
  
 
[[Category:Bell_Foundries]]
 
[[Category:Bell_Foundries]]

Revision as of 17:28, 20 February 2019

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The Paul Revere Foundry, Massachusetts was a historically famous foundry of ornamental household products; a side product line was the casting of church & school bells.

The Revere Foundry, Established in 1821 was operated by Joseph Revere and Paul Revere III, (Paul Revere’s grandson) until 1828. During this time, Paul Revere III and hisi apprentice, William Blake, cast some 334 church bells (1821 to 1830). The church bell casting became a separate company: Revere & Blake Foundry, Boston, Ma. (The Paul Revere Foundry became the Revere Copper Co., incorporated in 1828, and still exists today.)

William Blake & Paul Revere III continued the church bell casting with an apprentice, Henry Hooper. In 1830, the foundry became known as the Hooper, Blake & Revere Foundry until 1868.
Post Civil War, the foundry operated as the Hooper, Blake & Richardson Foundry; later as the Henry N. Hooper & Co., and The Hooper Co.

George Holbrook was another apprentice of Revere's who cast bells of his own in Boston. George continued to work in the foundry after operations were handed over to his son George Handel Holbrook. Chime Master has renovated an 1833 Holbrook bell for the Whitin Mill in Whitinsville Mass. with replicas of the original wooden yoke and wheel.